Z is for…

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Well, this has been fun!

Start over at “A is for…”

block-zis for
ZEBRA.
Duh.

Travels with Gannon and Wyatt

Some scientists maintain that the zebra’s stripes evolved to thwart horsefly infestation, which would have reduced the chance for disease. Indeed, there is evidence that the zebra’s stripes disrupt the horizontal pattern of polarized light reflected from dark surfaces that normally attracts horseflies. This would make the zebra’s striped fur less attractive to horseflies than the solid-coloured fur of horses.
Encyclopædia Britannica

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Y is for…

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block-y
is for…

Commenter kindltot corrects me that this is not a Yak. Whoopsie. So, I’ll just leave the pic and we can pretend that Scottish highland cattle starts with Y? Ahem…


wall.alphacoders.com

block-y
is for
YAK,
because there
isn’t really
anything else
.

Yak: Note hump


animal-wildlife.blogspot.com

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X is for…

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block-x
is for
XENOSAURUS,
which is not
a dinosaur.


reptile-database.reptarium.cz

Xenosaurus grandis, commonly known as the knob-scaled lizard, is a species of diurnalterrestrial lizard endemic to Mexico and Guatemala. It primarily inhabits tropical rainforests. It dwells in rock crevices and eats insects.¹

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V is for…

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block-v
is for
VIRUS


Giant Virus Stirs in Permafrost | Time

Josie LAre germs animal, vegetable or mineral, or are different types of germs different?

Erik

Best Answer: Depends on the definition of germs.

If you’re talking about microorganisms, it’s a diverse field where you find among other things; fungi (neither plant nor animal), bacteria (similar to animals), protists (algeae) and viruses (not living).

The classification system you mention (animal/vegetable/mineral) is not used very much nowadays.

Source(s): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Germ_theory_of_disease

Erik· 10 years ago

Yahoo! Answers

“Viruses (not living)…”?
Whoopsie!
Well, then,

block-v
is for
(spins wheel)

 

Vampire Bat (Desmodontinae)
Vampire Bat?

Vervet Monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythrus)
Vervet Monkey?

vicuna-image-01
Vicuna?

viper-image-01
Viper?

Vulture (Aegypius Monachus)
Vulture?

block-v
is for
VOLE!
Because, just look:

Learning About Love From Prairie Vole Bonding : NPR

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U is for…

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Well, it’s either this
or the Umbrella Bird
umbrella-bird-fonzie

block-uis for
UAKARI MONKEY.


bobcatravel.com

Uakari (UK/wəˈkɑːri/,[2] US/wɑː-/)[3] is the common name for the New World monkeys of the genus Cacajao. Both the English and scientific names are believed to have originated from indigenous languages.[4]¹


unbelievable-facts.com

The uakaris are unusual among New World monkeys in that the tail length (15–18 cm) is substantially less than their head and body length (40–45 cm). Their bodies are covered with long, loose hair but their heads are bald. They have almost no subcutaneous fat, so their bald faces appear almost skull-like. Like their closest relatives the saki monkeys, they have projecting lower incisors.¹

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T is for…

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block-t
is for
THYLACINE,
The Tasmanian Tiger,
because
Australia
does it again.


babiesonearth.blogspot.com

The thylacine (/ˈθləsn/ THY-lə-seen,[11] or /ˈθləsn/ THY-lə-syne,[12] also /ˈθləsɪn/;[13] (from Ancient Greek θύλακος thúlakos, “pouch, sack” + Latin -inus “-ine”) (Thylacinus cynocephalus), now extinct, was the largest known carnivorous marsupial mammal, evolving about 4 million years ago. The last known live animal was captured in 1933 in Tasmania. It is commonly known as the Tasmanian tiger because of its striped lower back, or the Tasmanian wolf because of its canid-like characteristics.[14] It was native to continental Tasmania, New Guinea, and the Australian mainland.
Wikipedia

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S is for…

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block-s
is for
STARFISH
because Starfish
are so weird.
Also beautiful.
Also weird.


Royal starfish (Astropecten articulatus) – Wikimedia

Marine scientists have undertaken the difficult task of replacing the beloved starfish’s common name with sea star because, well, the starfish is not a fish.
National Geographic

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